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2014

How to Link to Land

Programs help aspiring farmers learn about available farmland in Vermont.

Written by Andrew Stowe | November 26, 2013

Photo of Katie and Jaska by Calley Hastings

“The key was that we didn’t know what we didn’t know.”

In describing their farm journey, Jaska Bradeen, 29, and Katie Sullivan, 30, of Sheep and Pickle Farm in Brookfield, return again and again to this problem, one that they and many other beginning farmers like them have faced when first looking for land.

Planting a LiLi

Written by Caroline Abels | August 22, 2014

Ribbon cutting at Back to the Future Farm

To understand what the LiLi pasteurizer—conceived and developed in Vermont—could mean to the dairy community of Orange County, New York, I drove to the Hudson Valley in early July and chatted with some longtime dairy farmers.

Getting One’s Goat

New farm connects newly arrived Americans with fresh goat meat

Written by Suzanne Podhaizer | May 23, 2014

Chuda Dhaurali with his goats

Although Vermont is known for its goat’s milk cheeses, it hasn’t always been an easy place to find local goat meat. To acquire a goat, Chuda Dhaurali used to trek to Boston or New Hampshire from his home in Burlington, spending money on gas and occasionally getting lost in the process. Sometimes “it would take the whole day,” he says.

Flourishing in the Fields

Written by Jaimie Scanlon | February 21, 2014

Students at Kern Hattin Farm

Tucked into a scenic hillside just off of Route 5 in Westminster is Kurn Hattin Homes for Children. Founded 120 years ago, Kurn Hattin is a charitable year-round home for boys and girls from around the Northeast whose families—for whatever reason—are unable to care for them.

“It tastes like…”

How we talk about—or don’t talk about—flavor

Written by Helen Labun Jordan | November 26, 2013

Helen Labun Jordan

A food’s flavor can be hard to describe. We have a whole vocabulary for talking about how food is produced with terms like organic, heirloom, grass fed, pasture raised, line caught, cage free, community supported, miles traveled. 

Apples’ Golden Age

Written by Helen Labun Jordan | August 22, 2014

Apple Tree

I didn’t know an apple could be revolutionary just by being green. Yet in the 1980s, when Granny Smiths began to claim their slice of the supermarket produce aisle, they broke up the duopoly of red and yellow (mostly red) and proved that consumers could accept different-looking apples.

Mushroom Grower, Man of Peace

Amir Hebib’s journey from war-torn Bosnia to the markets of Burlington

Written by Andrew Simon | May 23, 2014

Amir Hebib

Sitting with Amir Hebib in his living room in Colchester, sipping herbal tea made from his own spearmint and lemon balm, you get a sense of peace, of refuge. But when you talk to Amir about his life, you discover that the road to this peaceful Vermont home has been a difficult, war-blasted one.

Horticultural Therapy

Written by Abigail Healey | February 21, 2014

Connie at Holton Home

The day is warm and clear. I am in my work uniform, which consists of shorts and a tank top; this is all I can stand to put on, for the heat of early summer is strong upon us. My supervisor, an elderly woman who needs the assistance of a walker to get around, is wearing a light sweater and long pants. “Aren’t you cold?” she asks suspiciously, as she watches me turn the soil in a bed designated for the season’s heirloom tomatoes.

Winter Bounty

Vermont growers use innovative structures and methods to feed us during the coldest months.

Written by Brooke Werley | November 26, 2013

High tunnels at Screamin' Ridge Farm

It is almost winter in Vermont. The familiar crunch accompanies the early riser’s first steps onto the frosted tips of grass. Where the garden once teemed with large leaves of Swiss chard and the sweetest of cherry tomatoes, there remain only a few flattened beet leaves and carrot tops left behind from the fall harvest.

The Challenges of Sourcing Locally

Written by Elena Gustavson | August 22, 2014

The chalkboard at DownStreet Eats, Cabot

The sun is up, the kids are stirring, and as I sit at my kitchen counter in Cabot with a cup of strong black coffee in hand, I review my list: 7 a.m.,Kids to School; 8 a.m., Craftsbury; 9 a.m., Hardwick; 9:45 a.m., East Hardwick; 10:30 a.m., Kitchen.

Farm-ecology

How one Vermont farm is addressing climate change and pollinator loss.

Written by Nancy Hayden | May 23, 2014

Apple blossoms at The Farm Between

My husband, John, reminds me every so often that in a world of seven billion people it is a privilege to own land. This is a good thing to contemplate as I stack brush and run it through the wood chipper. After a long winter, I’m already feeling the ache in my back and shoulders from only a few hours of work.

Fields, with Geese

Written by Suzanne Podhaizer | February 21, 2014

Geese in a field

In an email sent just before our first date, in February of 2013, Wesley Bascom posed a multiple-choice question. “Are you interested in serving goose...?” he asked. The choices he provided for my response were: a) “Totally down to pluck!” b) “Maybe. I will take a gander at it.” c) “Foie gras? More like foie naw.”

Know Your Local-i-tea

With Wild or Cultivated Herbs, You Can Create Your Own Locally Grown Teas.

Written by Alice Eckles | November 27, 2013

Illustration of Dandelion from Gerard’s General History of Plants, 1597

What’s the secret to staying warm and healthy although a long, cold Vermont winter? Many gardeners and herbalists would agree that teas made from our wild and garden herbs are the soothing secret to health and happiness, especially in winter.

Farmers' Kitchen—Zucchini Gone Wild

Written by Oliver Levis | August 22, 2014

Bonnie and Kate and the zucchini

Not many people would say zucchini is their favorite vegetable, but it’s an easy one to grow and it probably puts out more pounds of edible matter than any other plant in the garden.

Cafeteria Cooking: A New Era in Vermont Schools

Written by Bonnie North | May 23, 2014

Karyl Kent, David Horner, and Alison Forrest

We all know that “You can lead a horse to water, but you can’t make him drink.” Similarly, as any parent knows, you can put good, healthy food on kids’ lunch plates but that’s no guarantee they’ll actually eat it. But who can blame them? Consider what they’re used to.

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A quarterly magazine devoted to covering local food, sustainable farming, and the many people building the Vermont food system.

Vermont's Local Banquet Magazine illuminates the connections between local food and Vermont communities. Our stories, interviews, and essays reveal how Vermont residents are building their local food systems, how farmers are faring in a time of great opportunity and challenge, and how Vermont’s agricultural landscape is changing as the localvore movement shapes what is grown and raised here.

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