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2013

Reflections of a Restaurateur | Part 4

Part lV: From Jefferson to Jello

Written by Suzanne Podhaizer | December 04, 2012

Chef Courtney White, at the Montpelier restaurant Salt, making dried kale “seaweed” flavored with miso, tamari, and orange.

One of Thomas Jefferson’s favorite snacks was anchovy deviled eggs. He was also wild about fresh peas, and several of his surviving handwritten recipes are for creamy French desserts. I know this because at my Montpelier restaurant, Salt, we once spent several weeks cooking and serving dishes that were common at fancy Monticello dinner parties or inspired by the late president’s extensive garden.

A Localvore’s Dilemma

“Should I buy local or organic?”

Written by Caitlin Gildrien | December 03, 2012

A localvore's dilimma

It’s a sign of the maturity of Vermont’s sustainable agriculture and local foods movement that this has become a prevalent and perplexing question. Is it better to buy a local, organic carrot or one that’s just local? Even more challenging, is it better to buy a local, conventionally grown carrot, or an organic carrot from far away?

Farmers' Kitchen—Farm & Ferment

Written by Barbara & Doug Flack | December 02, 2012

Flack Family Farm

Our farm is centered around regeneration, inspired by Rudolf Steiner and more recent developments in the rebuilding of high-functioning soils and plants. We regard our farm as a self-contained entity, with its own organ systems (microbes, fungi, cattle, etc.), character, economic, social, and ecological life.

Mark Kurlansky's "The Food of a Younger Land"

The Eating Habits of Americans (from the 1930s WPA chronicles)

| December 01, 2012

Photos from the Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Division.

In the 1930s, writers for the Works Progress Administration (WPA) chronicled the eating habits of Americans. Here are some Vermont excerpts, as collected in Mark Kurlansky’s The Food of a Younger Land:

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A quarterly magazine devoted to covering local food, sustainable farming, and the many people building the Vermont food system.

Vermont's Local Banquet Magazine illuminates the connections between local food and Vermont communities. Our stories, interviews, and essays reveal how Vermont residents are building their local food systems, how farmers are faring in a time of great opportunity and challenge, and how Vermont’s agricultural landscape is changing as the localvore movement shapes what is grown and raised here.

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