• Publishers' Note Fall 2009

    Publishers' Note Fall 2009

    There’s a quiet revolution going on.

    On a late afternoon this past July, we visited the Westgate Farmers’ Market in West Brattleboro. Never heard of this one? That’s not surprising, as the market is in its first year and it’s not your typical farmers’ market. It’s a small one by current standards—there’s only one farmer—but its potential is evident in the delight of the children. How often do you hear a squabble over how many bunches of kale to buy or, “Should we get the green beans or the broccoli?”

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  • How to Start a Community Garden

    How to Start a Community Garden

    Back in January, as my husband and I searched for a place to live in Middlebury, we had big plans to create a summer vegetable garden. But it quickly became clear that housing in town with gardening space wouldn’t be easy to find. Apartments that advertised a “big yard” always seemed to have a “scruffy lawn,” and few landlords reacted well to my desire to dig out a portion of that lawn to plant vegetables.

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  • Horsepower: Taking the Reins

    Horsepower: Taking the Reins

    So much of what I love about agriculture is exemplified by draft horses. Like small farms, they have continued to exist, sometimes in spite of us, and often despite what is popular. They accept the seasons and adapt to them, growing heavy coats in the winter and glistening ones in the summer. True localvores, they eat what the land produces and find pleasure in the small yet important things, like the taste of new grass in spring.

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  • Getting Everyone to the Table

    Getting Everyone to the Table

    Back in January, as my husband and I searched for a place to live in Middlebury, we had big plans to create a summer vegetable garden. But it quickly became clear that housing in town with gardening space wouldn’t be easy to find. Apartments that advertised a “big yard” always seemed to have a “scruffy lawn,” and few landlords reacted well to my desire to dig out a portion of that lawn to plant vegetables.

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  • Set the Table with Winter Squash

    Set the Table with Winter Squash

    A couple of years ago, as the gardening season at the Westminster West Elementary School came to a close, my fellow Master Gardener and school garden coordinator, Albin Zak, and I joined the 30 kids and their teachers for a squash-tasting event. First and second grade teacher Alison Taylor had made up recording sheets for the children to fill out as they sampled the various squashes we had prepared—they could circle the smiling faces for the squash they liked, and the frowning faces for those they didn’t.

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  • A New (Old) Source of Local Food

    A New (Old) Source of Local Food

    I hear the dull thump of heavy stones against the trees from far through the rustling wood, where boys are ranging for nuts.
    —Henry David Thoreau

    In this journal entry from October 24, 1857, Thoreau was referring to boys who were “chestnutting”—rattling the trunks of American chestnut trees to loosen the green, spiny husks that held sweet, glossy-brown nuts.

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  • Farming & Feasting with the Robinsons: Autumn

    Farming & Feasting with the Robinsons: Autumn

    When autumn arrives in Vermont, it’s as if the searing heat of summer is absorbed by the maple trees and expressed through their blazing foliage. This signals the fiery death of another growing season, and the rapid retreat to winter’s dormancy. Ann Robinson Minturn remarked on this bittersweet transition in a letter to her husband, Lloyd, in September 1866: “The country never could be lovelier in September, I am sure, than during the present one—but it is always a melancholy month for me.”

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  • Women’s Agricultural Network—WAgN

    Women’s Agricultural Network—WAgN

    We all know that the number of farmers in America is declining and their age is increasing. Given that farming is often associated with men, we may interpret this to mean that fewer men are going into farming. But the word farmer isn’t gender specific. The number of women in agriculture is actually growing, according to experts in the field.

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  • Communities on the Corner

    Communities on the Corner

    The local foods movement can claim its roots in Vermonters’ earliest enterprises. Long before ski vacations and the Golden Dome, there was boiling down maple sap and digging root crops for the winter. But food isn’t the only part of our local economy with a long pedigree. Our country stores have a history that stretches through the centuries, close on the heels of those first farms. And like those farms, today’s country stores are both celebrated by their community and challenged to find a viable business model to carry them into the future.

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  • Farmers' Kitchen—No Ordinary Cheese Puffs

    Farmers' Kitchen—No Ordinary Cheese Puffs

    The day-to-day swing of life at Orb Weaver Farm is determined by the season. Spring, with its lengthening days, finds us ending our cheese-making and cow chores and looking forward to the summer growing season. Beginning in June our cows are literally “put out to pasture” for the warmer months, and our efforts turn toward our market garden, which for the past 29 years has supplied our local food co-op with a variety of organic produce.

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  • Last Morsel—A Farmer Forages

    Last Morsel—A Farmer Forages

    During cross-country excursions in college to nuclear reactors, desert lettuce fields, the Glen Canyon dam and other heartbreaking landscapes, I decided the best way not to perpetuate the hell of modern life would be to learn to grow my own food. To that end, I spent my 20s working as an apprentice on small organic vegetable farms and dairies, then eventually purchased six acres in Craftsbury on which to exercise my dissent. For the past five years I have been raising milk and beef cows, lambs, meat and laying hens, turkeys, and vegetables, in addition to teaching and writing.

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Publishers' Note Fall 2009

Draft Horses

Written on

September 01 , 2009

There’s a quiet revolution going on.

On a late afternoon this past July, we visited the Westgate Farmers’ Market in West Brattleboro. Never heard of this one? That’s not surprising, as the market is in its first year and it’s not your typical farmers’ market. It’s a small one by current standards—there’s only one farmer—but its potential is evident in the delight of the children. How often do you hear a squabble over how many bunches of kale to buy or, “Should we get the green beans or the broccoli?”

Unlike a traditional farmers’ market, which is centrally located, this market has set down its roots smack dab in the community it serves: a low- to middle-income housing community called Westgate. For shoppers, it means a short walk to the weekly market and no one has to drive. And it brings affordable, organic, fresh, local food to the doorsteps of people who have lacked access to it in the past. Oh, and did we mention community building? After the market, there is a potluck community dinner at the Westgate Community Center, to which all are invited. You can read more about this pilot project on page 8.

On another afternoon in July, approximately 50 of us lunched on a delicious gourmet meal prepared by “Chef“ Ana, a farmer from Guerrilla Grown Produce in Westminster. It consisted of grilled blueberry pork chops, new potato and pea salad, and a fresh salad of baby Asian greens, grated carrots, chioggia beets, scallions, summer radishes, and cucumbers, accompanied by cornbread and rolls. The table was covered with white tablecloths and multiple vases overflowing with colorful summer flowers that were a sight to behold. And for dessert, there was a warm blueberry panecotta—heaven itself! Everything was fresh and organically grown or raised in the surrounding area, even the flowers.

But we weren’t at the most expensive restaurant in town—we were dining at the First Congregational Church on Route 5 in Westminster. The monthly Localvore Lunch that’s held there is a collaborative effort initiated by Westminster Cares in Westminster, Our Place Drop-In Center in Bellows Falls, and the Council on Aging. These organizations, along with volunteers, have teamed up to provide a new community meal for those on a fixed or limited income. The goals are to help them remain healthy and to connect them to food and to each other. Nearly 100 percent of the ingredients in the meals are from local farms, and food-related costs are covered by the Council on Aging with American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 funds. Donations of any amount are accepted but no one is turned away due to their inability to pay. The next luncheons are planned for September 16 and October 21. To make a reservation or for more information, call 802-722-3607 or visit Westminster Cares’ website at www.westminstercares.org.

So this is what makes a revolution: a farmers’ market and a monthly community luncheon that bring affordable, organic, fresh, local food to people who have lacked access to it in the past. These events refute the idea that local food is only available to the wealthy, and they bridge the gap between local eaters and local food—the coalescence of cucumber, tomato, and community!

We believe this is what the future holds. Viva la revolución!

Meg Lucas
Barbi Schreiber

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A quarterly magazine devoted to covering local food, sustainable farming, and the many people building the Vermont food system.

Vermont's Local Banquet Magazine illuminates the connections between local food and Vermont communities. Our stories, interviews, and essays reveal how Vermont residents are building their local food systems, how farmers are faring in a time of great opportunity and challenge, and how Vermont’s agricultural landscape is changing as the localvore movement shapes what is grown and raised here.

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