• Publishers' Note Fall 2007

    Publishers' Note Fall 2007

    Congratulations to all the new and seasoned “Localvores” who took part in this year’s challenge and enjoyed every bite, knowing that you were supporting your farmer neighbors in their efforts to provide the fresh, delicious, and nutritious food we’re so fortunate to have in this state! Some friends from Williston commented, “How can you go back to eating anything else that isn’t locally grown or raised after you’ve spent an entire week of tasting the difference?” We couldn’t agree more!

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  • Experimenting with Diversity

    Experimenting with Diversity

    Ever since I was in grade school and heard about Gregor Mendel and his famous hybrid sweet peas, I’ve been fascinated with the notion of conducting experiments with plants in a garden. Of course Mendel really was a scientist, while I’m something between an enthusiastic gardener and a tiny-scale farmer. I don’t expect my own experiments will yield anything as ground-breaking as the laws of heredity, but I always hope they will prove valuable in guiding my work the following year. And besides, they’re really fun!

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  • Cheese Culture

    Cheese Culture

    In 1882, Emil Frey, a Swiss immigrant working at a deli-owner’s cheese factory in Monroe, N.Y., supplied his boss’s deli with a spreadable cheese called Bismarck schlossekase. Inspired by this cheese, Frey went on to create a bewitching cultural and food revolution with a processed cheese that would be called Velveeta. Along with Cheez Whiz, Philadelphia Cream Cheese and La Vache Qui Rit, Velveeta and its industrial counterparts have obscured the legacy of thousands of years of traditional cheesemaking.

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  • Local Agricultural Community Exchange

    Local Agricultural Community Exchange

    When the Farmers Diner left Barre for Quechee last fall, it left a “local food gap” downtown that is being filled by a new nonprofit initiative called LACE. The name stands for Local Agricultural Community Exchange. It’s a local-oriented grocery store, cafe, and educational center located in the former Homer Fitts Co. department store in downtown Barre. LACE’s founder, Ariel Zevon, has made it her mission to help the Barre community reconnect with local farmers and provide healthy food to the people of central Vermont. 

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  • Farmers' Kitchen—Turkey Broth

    Farmers' Kitchen—Turkey Broth

    Most people who eat the turkeys from our farm say they’re the best they’ve ever had. It must be all the sunshine and fresh air our birds get. Or perhaps it’s the buckwheat, oats, and clover we grow for them to forage in. Maybe it’s the grasshoppers they chase around. Whatever the case, something makes these turkeys really healthy and good.  Every hawk, eagle, fox, coyote, and owl in the area seems to want to jump every hurdle to get to them.

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  • Green Mountains and Amber Waves

    Green Mountains and Amber Waves

    Over the past few years, many Vermonters have embraced the local foods movement. Farmers’ markets are thriving, community supported agriculture shares are growing, and local grass-fed meat, pastured poultry, farm fresh eggs, and other products have become more widely available. But one of the challenges the local eater finds is the limited availability of some staple foods not widely grown in Vermont, such as nuts and seeds (which are pressed into cooking oil) and grains and flour. The eater may ask, ‘Why doesn’t my local bread have more local flour?’

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  • Sub Rosa

    Sub Rosa

    If you walk along the back roads and country lanes of rural Vermont this fall, you’re likely to encounter wild roses. Sometimes you’ll find them near old cellar holes and abandoned roads. You can easily distinguish the wild rose because, unlike its hybrid relative, it has only five petals.

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  • Land of Plenty

    Land of Plenty

    Rutland is important to me. After leaving Vermont for several years, trying out such places as North Carolina, southern California, and South Dakota, I chose to return here in 2000 with my own children to live where my grandparents, my parents, and my husband and I all grew up. Although many of my childhood peers had settled elsewhere, I was determined to use my education to help make Rutland a better place. I now do this in part through my work at the Community College of Vermont, where I advise students, hire instructors, and teach in various disciplines.

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Local Agricultural Community Exchange

LACE

Written on

September 01 , 2007

When the Farmers Diner left Barre for Quechee last fall, it left a “local food gap” downtown that is being filled by a new nonprofit initiative called LACE. The name stands for Local Agricultural Community Exchange. It’s a local-oriented grocery store, cafe, and educational center located in the former Homer Fitts Co. department store in downtown Barre. LACE’s founder, Ariel Zevon, has made it her mission to help the Barre community reconnect with local farmers and provide healthy food to the people of central Vermont.  

The bread and butter of LACE is a store which sells Vermont-made natural foods and supplies, as well as local produce. You’ll find such things as a stick of pepperoni from Vermont Smoke & Cure in Barre for $3.59 and a 16-ounce tub of yogurt from the Vermont Milk Company in Hardwick for $1.50, plus a fresh vegetable section stocked with items from Vermont farmers.  (Although all the produce is grown naturally, the vegetables aren’t exclusively organic because LACE didn’t want to exclude growers who are not certified organic.)

Photos and descriptions of local farmers are posted throughout the market, and once a month the community has the opportunity to meet a farmer at the store.  An adjacent restaurant serves healthy, locally grown foods.  Additional space features Vermont-crafted non-food items, such as handmade soaps and cleaners.

“It seems illogical to rely on mega-industrial food suppliers from thousands of miles away when there are family farms all around us struggling to make ends meet,” Zevon said. “By using local resources our community will become more self-reliant; by learning more about the food we eat everyday we will become healthier in mind and body; by channeling our money back into the land that feeds us we will boost the local economy and preserve our rural farming landscape.”

LACE also has a farm-to-community kitchen which residents are able to use to can their own food or turn local crops into value-added products, such as pickles. There are plans for a root cellar and meat storage locker, as well as cooking and agricultural classes. Barre librarian Heather Herzig currently comes to LACE to read food-related stories to children, who then go into the kitchen and prepare the food. It’s called Cook-A-Book story time. 
 
Zevon is the daughter of the late singer and songwriter Warren Zevon and god-daughter to close family friend Jackson Brown, the popular guitarist and singer.  Brown gave a concert in support of LACE on June 13 at the Barre Opera House, raising $60,000. The audience was treated to great music and produce from Vermont farmers. 
 
Zevon said LACE has been well received by the Barre community. And since affordability is often a challenge for stores that sell locally grown produce and Vermont-made goods, Zevon is attempting to serve the whole community by providing leftover food to the needy after lunch and at the end of the day.

“One of my goals is to reach across the gamut from gourmet foodie types to low-income families and to make sure that everyone feels welcome,” she said.

Overcoming Challenges

Necessity is the mother of invention, and Ariel Zevon is a mother whose invention was conceived out of necessity. When Ariel, a resident of Barre, realized that she was pregnant with twin boys, Gus and Max, she began to re-evaluate what she was eating. These two new lives depended upon her choices, and the importance of finding the healthiest food available suddenly became paramount. But Ariel couldn’t find everything that she was looking for in one location, so she set her mind to creating it. Her vision became LACE, a market in Barre that sells only locally-grown, Vermont-produced food items.

Ariel knew there could be difficulties in trying to offer fresh, local foods throughout the year yet still be affordable. But then she discovered that other retailers accomplish this by processing and packaging their own line of foods. (Trader Joe’s is one example.) Ariel realized that, by having a commercial kitchen at LACE, local produce and other perishable items could be prepared and preserved in various ways that could make them available during the winter months. This method would keep the price down, since many of the items being “put by” would have already been paid for, as part of the weekly supply for the market and cafe. Additionally, all preparation and packaging would be handled by LACE, as would the picking up of food from farms. This would also allow Ariel and her husband Ben Powell to get to know farmers and provide a service for them at the same time. Once a truck was found, and utilizing Ben’s ingenuity, they turned it into a vehicle powered by vegetable oil, eliminating significant fuel and environmental costs.

Ariel is a visionary beyond her 31 years but acknowledges that one of the biggest challenges still lies ahead: will the community choose to buy their groceries from LACE instead of the larger stores they’ve become used to shopping in? Ariel is hoping that area residents discover the inherent benefits of buying close to home.

—Barbi Schreiber

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A quarterly magazine devoted to covering local food, sustainable farming, and the many people building the Vermont food system.

Vermont's Local Banquet Magazine illuminates the connections between local food and Vermont communities. Our stories, interviews, and essays reveal how Vermont residents are building their local food systems, how farmers are faring in a time of great opportunity and challenge, and how Vermont’s agricultural landscape is changing as the localvore movement shapes what is grown and raised here.

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Home Stories Issues 2007 Fall 2007 | Issue 2 Local Agricultural Community Exchange