Garden Pathways

Garden Pathways

Gardening Like the Forest

Written by Mark Krawczyk | March 01, 2010

Garden illustration

Modern gardeners have grown accustomed to segregating different types of plants into different places—herbs in one bed, veggies in another, perennials and flowers somewhere else, while the orchard stands alone. But this isn’t the way things work in a forest. Nature functions in wholes, enabling cooperation between species to generate robust, resilient systems that optimize the use of available sun, water, nutrients, and space.

Sylvia’s Special Seeds

Written by Sharon Mueller | September 01, 2008

Sylvia Davatz Garden

I’d heard rumors of what might be growing in Sylvia Davatz’s greenhouse. Wheat from an alpine village. Greens throughout the winter. A tomato that lasts until December. Even peanuts! I wondered: What might be going on at Sylvia’s? Plants like these aren’t normally grown in Vermont.

One Greenhouse, Many Winter Greens

Written by Sharon Mueller | March 01, 2008

Photo of Carol’s greenhouse by Sharon Mueller

In the depths of winter, a visit to Carol Stedman’s new greenhouse in Hartland provides a breath of spring. A sea of tiny greens waves hello. Claim a seat on the cement blocks that ring the 2-ft. high garden beds, bend over, and take a whiff of soil and fresh growing things. This is what I did on a recent January day. With snow blanketing the out-of-doors, the air temperature inside was only slightly higher than outside, not really warm. But the soil… a thermometer stuck deep in the dirt read a balmy 60 degrees. What was going on?

Biodynamics and Me

Written by Tatiana Schreiber | December 01, 2007

phases of the moon

I have never thought of myself as a “spiritual” person. Although I have much admiration for the values and ethical traditions associated with the secular Judaism I was raised in, I have tended to eschew the organized aspect of religion. My secular upbringing did not prevent me, however, from noticing that the world around me was spectacularly complex and beautiful. The littlest things (a spider’s web!) inspired my utmost appreciation and respect. Later, I channeled this appreciation in the direction of science, trying to understand life processes through the study of biology and botany, microbiology and biochemistry.

Grow Where You Work

Written by Charlie Nardozzi | May 25, 2016

Northeast Kingdom Community Action – Barton

Across the country, employees are realizing the benefits of gardening where they work. And as company wellness programs proliferate, employers are looking for creative ways to engage their staff.

The Great Garden Cover Up

Written by Charlie Nardozzi | February 09, 2016

Charlie Nardozzi workshop

Cover crops and green manures may be terms you usually associate with farming, but they’re important for even a small-scale home gardener. “Cover crops” usually refers to grains or legumes grown in fall to “cover” the soil in winter.

Aronia and Elderberry: Thy Medicine

Written by Nancy Hayden | August 24, 2015

Elderberry Shurbs

Aronia and elderberry are two fruits—native to Vermont and other places in the eastern United States—that are getting noticed by health-conscious consumers. The word on the street these days is “nutraceutical”—in this case, referring to berries that aren’t just nutritious but also have medicinal properties.

Polyphony in the Garden

Written by Tatiana Schreiber | May 26, 2015

Hummingbird moth on bergamot

When I work in the garden, surrounded by vegetables, flowering plants, and herbs, with several species of bees buzzing in the big, purple, flowering clusters of anise hyssop at the ends of all the beds, and a breeze fluttering the leaves of the maples and oaks in the woods nearby, I sense polyphony at work in the natural world.

Putting the Garden to Bed

Written by Henry Homeyer | August 19, 2013

Various garden photos

There are many distractions at this time of year, whether school or watching football or catching up on work and e-mail after an August vacation. But one thing’s for sure: autumn—and winter—are coming, and we need to put our gardens to bed. A little extra work now will help us garden even better next year.

“Don’t Waste that Woodchuck…”

Written by Rose Paul | November 16, 2014

illustration, Pearson Scott Foresman collection

That’s what I told friends for two weeks after feasting on woodchuck stew. Don’t waste your pesky garden woodchuck—eat it!

Make Your Own Immune-Boosting Cough Syrup

Written by Juliette Abigail Carr | August 22, 2014


With cold season fast approaching and the autumn harvest at hand, consider creating this tasty, family-friendly remedy for winter ailments. As well as relieving those irritating coughs, this homemade cough syrup is a powerful immune booster.

Growing Unusual Veggies

Written by Henry Homeyer | May 23, 2014

Happy Rich and kohlrabi

Just because we live in northern New England doesn’t mean we have to subsist on carrots and potatoes. These familiar vegetables grow well for us despite our cool nights and relatively short summers. But so do tomatoes, a warm-climate vegetable, and other frost-sensitive vegetables like summer squashes, beans, and cukes. What we grow is largely what we know—and what our Grannies grew—but it doesn’t have to be this way.

A Fly in the Ointment

Fruit Growers Face a New Pest

Written by Vern Grubinger | July 03, 2013

Spotted wing drosophila

There’s a small insect causing big damage to soft fruits that ripen late in the season. It’s new to our area, and spreading fast. Spotted wing drosophila (SWD) has been buzzing across the country for the past few years. First, it was found in California in 2008; then in 2009 it moved to Florida, Oregon, and Washington. From Florida, it moved up the East Coast to arrive in New England in 2011, and last year it was found across much of Vermont.

Weed Eater

Written by Jen Rose Smith | June 01, 2012

Knot Weed Fool

‘What is a weed? A plant whose virtues have never been discovered.” —Ralph Waldo Emerson

I planned the dinner with Emerson’s optimism and an eye on my backyard. Through spring’s soaking rains I watched Japanese knotweed swell beside the garden shed and was cheered by the sight of garlic mustard peeping up between the raspberry canes. When slender stalks rose amidst the mustard’s heart-shaped leaves and a few early flowers appeared, it was time to send out the invitations.

The 9' x 12' Vegetable Garden

Some basics on how to start a plot of your own

Written by Henry Homeyer | March 01, 2009

Henry Homeyer gardening

If you’re able to devote 15 minutes a day to gardening and are willing to give up a piece of your lawn roughly the size of the parking space for your car, you can grow a significant amount of good food—food that is organic, food that is tasty, food that is healthy. During World War II, Americans started “victory gardens,” growing up to 40 percent of their fresh produce. In these tough economic times, it again makes sense for us to grow some of our own food.

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A quarterly magazine devoted to covering local food, sustainable farming, and the many people building the Vermont food system.

Vermont's Local Banquet Magazine illuminates the connections between local food and Vermont communities. Our stories, interviews, and essays reveal how Vermont residents are building their local food systems, how farmers are faring in a time of great opportunity and challenge, and how Vermont’s agricultural landscape is changing as the localvore movement shapes what is grown and raised here.


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