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Recipes tagged with: meat

  • Time: 50 minutes prep; 50 minutes in oven
  • Complexity: advanced

Mémé’s Good Times Tourtiére

Tourtiére

Meat Pies, (or tourtiére) are a traditional French Canadian dish, a treat that was served in our family on Christmas Eve and other special occasion. There is nothing better than a family recipe that has been handed down, and this one takes a little time, but is worth the effort, and you can even make it vegetarian! This is my version as I have substituted the local ground turkey for the beef and pork, but if you eat red meat, you may use it here; there are many options for locally raised, sustainable meats.

  • Time: 20 minutes prep; 20 minutes on stove
  • Complexity: very easy

Poutine Gravies—Classique Gravy

Poutine

My husband says that his family’s restaurant uses a different ratio of beef to chicken stock “than everyone else,” but he won’t tell me the ratio. I guessed. Feel free to do your own guessing, too. Most answers aren’t wrong.

  • Time: 20 minutes prep; 20 minutes on stove
  • Complexity: very easy

Poutine Gravies—Sausage Gravy

Poutine

I’m pretty sure that pork is the state meat of Québec. It’s everywhere. So it’s only fitting to make a poutine gravy with pork sausage. Fitting and delicious.

  • Time: 30 minutes prep; 20 minutes on stove
  • Complexity: easy

Cold Quell Soup

Cold Quell Soup

Serve this bold yet simple soup at the first suggestion of a cold or flu as a bit of preventative medicine: The oil from the mustard greens warms the nasal passages, helps disperse congestion, and increases energy flow throughout the body; the greens help move stuck energy; and the yam and ginger support qi and blood circulation. The yam’s sweet flavor also acts as a counterpoint to the piquant greens and ginger.

  • Time: 24–48 hours on stove
  • Complexity: easy

Bone Stock

Bone Broth

We make a week’s supply of stock and freeze any that we’re not going to use within five days. We use it liberally in our soups, stews, and any savory dish that calls for liquid. Or, for a quick energy boost, we season it to taste and drink it as an on-the-spot restorative. I often toss in a square of the mineral-rich kombu seaweed, which adds even more nutrients and enhances the stock’s savory (umami) flavor.

  • Time: 30 minutes prep; 20 minutes in oven; 6 minutes on stove
  • Complexity: medium

Alpaca “Steak Frites”

Alpaca “Steak Frites”

 From the Cas-Cad-Nac Farm Cookbook. Our family’s favorite recipe to come out of this project is Chef Matecat’s version of steak frites, which uses our alpaca striploin medallions. Lately, we’ve served them with the addition of a garlicky chimichurri sauce on the side.

  • Time: 20 minutes prep; 90 minutes in oven
  • Complexity: medium

Whole Roasted Chicken with Roasted Garlic and White Wine Jus

Garlic

The most important role of garlic, of course, is as an ingredient. Where to use garlic is like asking where one should use butter: everywhere.

  • Time: 30 minutes prep
  • Complexity: easy

Simple Crock-Pot Rabbit

Rabbit Stew

“My favorite way of cooking rabbit is to simmer it slowly with onions, celery, and seasonings,” Robin Schunk of New Discovery Farm says. “Then I pick the meat off the bone and use it for chili and quesadillas.”

After searching out a rabbit recipe for myself, I put together this using Robin’s favorite seasonings.

 
  • Time: 5–6 hours
  • Complexity: easy

Roasted Pork Shoulder

roast pork shoulder

I love cooking pork, but I’m not going to give you much of a recipe here. As a finished product, what you’ll get from this is a pile of pork that is salty and delicious. You can turn it into pulled pork, Bo Ssäm, some Italian gravy, or hundreds of other dishes. That part will be up to you.

In New England, these are often cut and called a Boston butt. Ours are bone-in with a nice fat cap on them, but this recipe can be made with a boneless piece or a picnic ham (fresh, not smoked). As long as you have a big piece of meat from the shoulder, it’ll be fine.

  • Time: 20 minutes prep
  • Complexity: easy

Mama Ganoush (or Move Over, Baba)

Mama Ganoush

For our “Mama Ganoush” we start by roasting all of the overgrown zucchini we can rustle up. Keep the mixture cold and enjoy this summer treat. It’s up to you if you want to tell your friends that it’s not made with eggplant.

 
  • Time: 20 minutes prep
  • Complexity: medium

Mutton Gyros

Mutton Gyros

Supporting mutton will expand your culinary reaches while saving you money. It will also add a revenue stream to the balance sheets of local sheep farmers, making their enterprises more competitive and sustainable. Mutton may be a vanishingly small piece of the culinary landscape of Vermont now, but a few people expressing interest in mutton by talking to a sheep farmer at the farmers’ market or calling a few nearby sheep farms could start the ball rolling.

 
  • Time: 10 minutes prep; bake 30 minutes
  • Complexity: easy

Vinegar Reduction Sauce

Vinegar Reduction Sauce

Nick Cowles of Shelburne Orchards says, “This is best with pork tenderloin or boneless pork chops. Yay, meat!”

 
  • Time: 30 minutes prep; bake 30 minutes
  • Complexity: medium

Stuffed Quince

Quince

Quince originated in the Caucasus region of Europe and predates apple cultivation. It may even have been the fruit of temptation in the Garden of Eden. To honor this, I adapted a recipe fromJerusalem: A Cookbook, by Yotam Ottolenghi and Sami Tamimi (2012).

  • Time: 30 minutes prep; slow cook 4–5 hours
  • Complexity: medium

Pot Roast with Tomatoes, Cinnamon, and Allspice

Pot Roast

Here’s a favorite grass-fed beef recipe for a busy after-school meal. I love using my crock pot for it! Adapted from Deborah Krasner’s Good Meat: The Complete Guide to Sourcing and Cooking Sustainable Meat (Stewart, Tabori & Chang, 2010).

  • Time: 30 minutes prep; 30 bake minutes
  • Complexity: medium

Cornbread Casserole

Cornbread Casserole

Sausage is a tasty step up from hamburger. It is plenty versatile and usually reasonably priced. Recently I was standing in a local food co-op eyeing some particularly tasty-looking local cornmeal and trying to figure out how to work it into me and my man’s dinner plans; we also needed a dish that would make some leftover lunches. Original recipe by Claire Fitts.

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