• Editor's Note Summer 2017

    Editor's Note Summer 2017

    Greetings!

    With this issue, I am stepping into the position of editor here at Local Banquet. Before I “retired” and moved from Maryland to Vermont I published a monthly called Baltimore Eats.

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  • Make It a Wild Summer

    Make It a Wild Summer

    For wildcrafters and other wild food junkies summer is time for the “main course,” when a treasure chest of rich, green, jeweled wild plants adorn the landscape. Wildcrafting is simply the “art” of collecting wild plants for food or medicine, and many common “weeds” are not only delicious and nutritious, but also offer a plethora of internal and external medicines.

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  • Set the Table with Butternuts

    Set the Table with Butternuts

    The first appearance of their sticky, lemon-shape green husks marked the end of summer when I was growing up, so the annual harvest of butternuts was oh so bittersweet.

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  • “Big Bertha”

    “Big Bertha”

    Anaerobic digesters (ADs) have been sprouting up on Vermont landfills and farms over the past 10–15 years, with a few even older. In an AD, microbes that can function without oxygen break down organic materials such as animal manure and food wastes, producing “biogas” in the process.

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  • All Souls Tortilleria

    All Souls Tortilleria

    On one wall of All Souls Tortilleria, a whiteboard is filled with the week’s open orders. Fresh-that-day masa; tortillas for Burlington’s El Cortijo and City Market; Mad Taco in Waitsfield and Montpelier; and bulk masa for Gracie’s Tamales of Waitsfield are among the list of regular accounts.

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  • Vermont Preserves Unusual Breeds

    Vermont Preserves Unusual Breeds

    As the major breeds of animals in agriculture become ever more populous, farmers are increasingly aware of the genetic peril we face when we rely on just a few highly specialized breeds of a handful of species.

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  • Q & A with  Lt. Governor David Zuckerman

    Q & A with Lt. Governor David Zuckerman

    David Zuckerman is the 81st lieutenant governor of Vermont, and is the first member of the Vermont Progressive Party to hold a statewide office. He is also a farmer.

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  • How To Be a Knife Ninja

    How To Be a Knife Ninja

    “How many here are knife ninjas?” After a pause, two or three hands creep up in the small crowd of flannel- and Carhart-clad students. This group from Green Mountain College is a bit shy, but definitely interested. “Great! How about you?”

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  • Last Morsel—When Worlds Collide

    Last Morsel—When Worlds Collide

    I butchered three sheep today. What does this mean to me as a man educated in liberal arts at Middlebury?

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Seeds For Change

The Chicken Event

Written by George Schenk | June 01, 2007

Chicken Illustration by George Schenk

It began simply enough:  I wanted to buy my neighbor’s chicken to serve at my Waitsfield restaurant.

“Can’t,” responded my neighbor, Hadley Gaylord.

“Why?”  I asked.

How To Be a Knife Ninja

Written by Elena Gustavson | May 15, 2017

Elena Gustavson, Bethany Yon, Nicole LeBlond

“How many here are knife ninjas?” After a pause, two or three hands creep up in the small crowd of flannel- and Carhart-clad students. This group from Green Mountain College is a bit shy, but definitely interested. “Great! How about you?”

To Market, to Bank

A petite vegetable farm in Saint Armand shares lessons in profitability.

Written by Suzanne Podhaizer | November 15, 2016

 Arial view of Les Jardins de la Grelinette

Québecois grower Jean-Martin Fortier draws a distinction between a good living and a good life.  “’A good living’ mostly refers to how much money you make,” he tells me during a phone call. A good life, in contrast, takes into account “how your time is spent, and to what purpose.”

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What we do

A quarterly magazine devoted to covering local food, sustainable farming, and the many people building the Vermont food system.

Vermont's Local Banquet Magazine illuminates the connections between local food and Vermont communities. Our stories, interviews, and essays reveal how Vermont residents are building their local food systems, how farmers are faring in a time of great opportunity and challenge, and how Vermont’s agricultural landscape is changing as the localvore movement shapes what is grown and raised here.

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